Ultem PEI Polyethermide thermoplastic component

When trying to choose the correct polymer for your application, understanding the materials can help you make your decision.  For parts that require superior strength and durability, Ultem® is often a great choice.

 Ultem® is a semi-transparent high strength plastic material that can operate in high service temperature environments.  It is the ideal choice for demanding, high heat applications and can withstand continuous operating temperatures of 340 degrees F while maintaining strength and rigidity.

 Ultem® is a member of the PEI (polyetherimide) family of thermoplastic resins. It provides a unique balance of mechanical properties and processability that gives engineers superior flexibility and freedom in design. Ultem is available in a variety of grades that provide enhanced chemical, heat, and elasticity benefits. It also features high tensile strength, stiffness, strength to weight ratio and dimensional stability.

Ultem® is the high-performance polyetherimide material of choice for many aerospace, aircraft, medical and pharmaceutical applications, including medical components. It offers exceptional mechanical properties and exhibits natural flame resistance and extremely low smoke generation.

  • Heat, solvent and flame resistant
  • High dielectric strength and stability
  • Excellent mechanical properties
  • Rigid and strong
  • Exceptional resistance to environmental forces

Performance Plastics is highly skilled at designing and molding using high performance materials such as Ultem®, Torlon®, PEEK, POM, and PPS.  We work with our customers to solve technically challenging problems.   We can propose materials to implement part functionality in the design stage of development. We offer manufacturing solutions such as a clean room, the ability to offer direct gating of fluoropolymers, high volume production, visual inspection and automated facilities.

For more information and solutions, please contact Rich Reed, Vice President of Sales & Marketing at 513-321-8404 or email rreed@performanceplastics.com

Insert Molding and Overmolding are very similar processes, but there are distinct differences between the two techniques.  Insert molding is a slightly faster one step process because two plastic materials are molded at the same time, while overmolding is a two-step process where two separately molded parts are combined to enhance the parts performance.

Insert molding is a process which adds metal parts to injection molded parts during molding rather than after the parts have cured.  This reduces the time for post-molding manufacturing/assembly operations. Inserts are placed into the mold cores or cast into the molds themselves. After the mold closes, plastic pellets are plasticized in the injector barrel and shot into the mold, the plastic material flowing around the captured inserts. Once the plastic hardens, the pieces are ejected from the mold, with the inserts now enclosed in the parts. Insert molding is a single-shot process

Insert molding is a common manufacturing method for producing connectors, electronic sockets, in addition to in making parts that are assembled with threaded fasteners. Insert molding is used to provide protective surfaces on many aerospace, defense, and medical/surgical devices.

Insert molding is also the term used to describe the overmolding technique of adding a layer of plastic material onto an existing metal or plastic part.  Here, also, the metal or plastic part is placed into a single-shot injection mold and the over-mold material is injected around it.

Overmolding is an advanced plastic injection technique that creates parts from two or more materials. Typically referred to as “in-mold assembly”, overmolding can be facilitated by either using the insert molding technique, or a multi shot molding technique.

Plastic overmolding, sometimes called multi-shot molding, adds additional material such as thermoplastic elastomer (TPE). Multi-shot molding is usually performed by way of multi-barrel injection molding machines, the process adding additional material shortly after the base is formed to create strong bonds between materials. Plastic overmolding serves to eliminate steps in the manufacturing process while creating enhanced injection molded products.

Depending on the materials selected for the base and the over-mold, materials may be bonded chemically or mechanically.  Inserts made of brass are common, but steel and stainless steel are also used.  Many of the inserts are knurled on the outside or have special shapes that hold the insert in place. Among the many materials that are suited to overmolding, polycarbonate, ABS, Ultem, and nylon. Over-mold materials include PEEK (Polyetheretherketone), FEP & PFA Fluoropolymers, (Neoflon, Polyflon) and PEI (Polyetherimide) Ultem.

Multi-shot overmolding has many applications such as medical instruments where it can provide enhanced grip, sterilization, moisture protection, and so on.  Automobile and Aerospace manufacturers use overmolding to reduce the need for additional assembly steps that would require using adhesives.

Insert Molding and Overmolding are very similar but have distinct differences.  Insert molding is a one step process, while overmolding is a two-step process where two separately molded parts are combined to enhance the parts performance.

 

The Lithium Ion Battery industry has begun using more and more plastic parts in their manufacturing processes. Most batteries intended for light vehicle usage now have 50% more plastic materials than they did even 10 years ago.  Some batteries have entirely plastic formulations ranging from the electrolyte (polymeric electrolytes) to the casing.  This is due to the very low weight of plastics as compared to metals. Plastic incorporation in batteries increases the electrolyte efficiency if used in polymeric electrolytes.

Commercially available lithium-ion batteries also use plastics. Plastic components incorporated in batteries include separators, gaskets, and casing components. Plastics have good shock absorbing characteristics and prevent damage to the basic cell unit from minor accidental shocks. Also, plastics such as Teflon® PFA, Ultem® PEI, and PPSU have high temperature resistance, corrosion resistance, and are electrical insulators so they are excellent at preventing short-circuit and “rapid disassembly.”

There has been a major shift from metal to resins in gasket manufacturing. Gaskets can be made from Ultem®, Ryton plastic and Fluoropolymers like PFA because of high heat resistance, chemical resistance, and ability to mold thin walls (.012”). Plastic parts may also lower the cost of production of batteries and may eventually replace most metallic components of batteries.

Performance Plastics is highly skilled at designing and molding high performance materials such as FEP/PFA, Ultem®, Torlon®, PEEK, POM, and PPS.  We work with our customers to solve technically challenging problems.   We can propose materials to implement part functionality in the design stage of development. We offer manufacturing solutions such as a clean room, the ability to offer direct gating of fluoropolymers, high volume production, visual inspection and automated facilities.

For more information and solutions, please contact Rich Reed, Vice President of Sales & Marketing at 513-321-8404 or email rreed@performanceplastics.com